Every Saturday DUBLIN FOOD CO-OP are hosting an Online Members’ Discussion. It’s a virtual place for our members
to meet up, chat and discuss topics they suggest. We plan
on continuing these meet up during lockdown to help us
feel the support of our community, even when we can’t
see each other in person.

To get involved please email ‘info@dublinfood.coop’
every week by Friday evening and we’ll send you the link.

Do you have an idea for the next reading, podcast, or film you’d like to
recommend for our online meet up? Please bring your suggestions
along or email them to info@dublinfood.coop.

11/7/20 – The Green New Deal

Photo greennewdealuk.org

Following on from last week’s discussion we have decided to
look more closely at the Green New Deal. 

Our reading is a short report from the New Economics Foundation
on the potential for the Green New Deal in the UK.

The report can be found here.

WHAT IS A GREEN NEW DEAL?

At its heart, the Green New Deal is a recognition that climate change
and the wider threat to our environment is a symptom of an economic
system that is broken. 

New Economics Foundation

While the report has a UK focus it provides a basis for thinking about
what a GND might look like in Ireland? What are the things we need to
prioritise in ensuring a GND can successfully take root? Do we think the
Programme for Government promises enough to make an Irish GND
effective? Are there any criticisms of the Green New Deal blueprint as
contained in the report?

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you
want to catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter
most to you, please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop
by Friday evening and we will send you a link to the call.

All are very welcome!

4/7/20 – Our New Programme for Government

This week’s task is to meditate on the Programme for Government.
It looks like the document will set a template for the early activities of
the new Government so let’s speculate about what we might expect. 

Are there causes for optimism or should we retain a certain scepticism?
How does the PfG approach the short and long term economic questions
that we are all facing into as we look hopefully towards an economic recovery?
To what extent does it promise to build a sustainable economy and a fairer country?

The Programme can be found here.

However, it is rather long and there are many shorter analyses available
online written from different perspectives. So perhaps you may prefer to
focus on one or two sections of the PfG or read some of the discussion it
has provoked. Here are a couple of examples, but feel free to find other
takes. It will all add to the debate!

Read takes from
The Journal
The Irish Social Enterprise Network
Irish Farmers’ Association
KPMG

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you
want to catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter
most to you, please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop
by Friday evening and we will send you a link to the call.

All are very welcome!

27/6/20 – Universal Basic Income

Photo by Christian Dubovan on Unsplash

This Saturday we are looking at the pros and cons of Universal
Basic Income. What are the advantages and disadvantages?
Should UBI be a key part of our post COVID economic recovery?

Our reading is Good New Idea, an essay by John Lanchester
featured in the London Review of Books.

Also included at the bottom of the article is the correspondence
provoked by it, which will provide plenty of discussion points for us too.

If you’d prefer to watch a documentary about the topic instead this
video essay compares Universal Basic Income and Salaire á Vie, a
related idea that addresses some criticisms of UBI.

Or you can listen to this podcast from Srsly Wrong for a more comedic
but thoroughly researched and well explained take on the topic.

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you want to
catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you,
please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop
by Friday evening and we will send you a link to the call.

All are very welcome!

20/6/20 – Co-operation and Social Justice

Martin Luther King Food Co-op in Arthur Capper Public Housing (photo by Roland Freeman in Smith 1974: 106)

In the wake of the Black Lives Matter Movement making headlines
around the world in recent weeks we are turning to the question
of co-operation and social justice. 

Specifically this week we are reflecting on how co-operatives can be used to
empower communities that are frequently overlooked.

Our reading is “Home Rule from Below: The Cooperative Movement
in Washington, D.C.”
, an essay by Johanna Bockman about the
relationship between the African-American community and the
co-operative movement in Washington DC from the 1960s onwards. 

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you want to
catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you,
please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop
by Friday evening and we will send you a link to the call.

All are very welcome!

13/6/20 – The Story of the Rochdale Pioneers

This Saturday we are going to continue our theme of the history
of Irish Credit Unions. The group have decided they want to reach
back into the history of the co-operative movement so we are
jumping back to the middle of the nineteenth century and the
story of the Rochdale Pioneers.

The start of the co-operative movement in Rochdale led to the
establishment of the Rochdale Principles which still form the basis
of the values we hold in the co-op movement today.

Why is Rochdale still so important for co-operators? Where did those
values come from? Are they still fit for purpose today?

This week’s reading is ‘Nineteenth Century Co-operation: From
Community Building to Shop-Keeping
‘ by Sidney Pollard.

You can also read more about the Rochdale Pioneers in this BBC
Manchester article or listen to this radio show about them from the series
British Socialism: The Grand Tour‘.

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you want to
catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you,
please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop
and we will send you a link to the call the day before.

All are very welcome!

6/6/20 – The History of Irish Credit Unions

This Saturday we are going to discuss the history of Irish Credit
Unions. We’ll be talking about the role they have played in society,
and thinking about the ways they might have an important
role to play in the future.

The photograph above shows president De Valera signing the Credit Union
Act in 1966 with Nora Herlihy, co-founder of the the credit union model in
Ireland. In the 50s Herlihy had become part of the co-operative movement
with the goal of reducing unemployment and emigration through the formation
of worker co-operatives. A woman after our own hearts!

The reading is two short chapters taken from a 2002 UCC study on credit union
history. You can read it here.

Recent developments and problems facing the credit unions sector may well be
our topic for another week so first off we’re grounding ourself in the history of
the movement in Ireland.

These are some other interesting resources about the history of the Irish Credit
Union movement that you might like to have a read through from History Ireland
and The Irish League of Credit Unions.

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you want to
catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you,
please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop
and we will send you a link to the call the day before.

All members are very welcome!

30/5/20 – Mondragon Co-operative,
Basque Country

Following on from last week’s discussion we are going to look at Mondragon Co-op
based in the Basque Country. Mondragon is frequently hailed as an important
example for people interested in building a more co-operative economy.

To find out more about Mondragon you can read this short Democracy Collaborative article.

This report by Alex Bird, a Welsh co-operative activist, is written from the point of view
of someone who visited Mondragon co-op.

If you prefer listening to reading this podcast covers the topic well.

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you want to catch
up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you, please join
us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop and we will send you
a link to the call the day before.

All members are very welcome!

23/5/20 – Socially Valuable Technology

Image: Worcester Radical Films


PLEASE NOTE a change to the originally advertised email address to take
part in this online event. If you’d like to get involved in this chat email
info@dublinfood.coop as normal, with the subject line ‘Online Discussion’.
We will contact our regular attendees to try make sure no-one misses
out due to our mistake.

This week’s discussion will focus on technology and its role within society –
who is it for? Who owns it? What makes something socially valuable?

The Lucas Plan
We are looking in particular at one example from the 1970s that came to be
known as ‘the Lucas Plan’. A group of engineers and workers in Britain put
together an innovative plan to transition the company they worked for
(Lucas Aerospace) into a firm that would produce socially valuable technologies.
The Lucas Plan went on to have a long-standing influence over debates about
sustainability and socially useful production.

We will then be using this example as a way to consider how technology
might be used in the context of the current public health crisis.

We plan to base our discussion on a short documentary on the Lucas Plan,
which you can watch here. You can also read this recent piece from RTE on how
technology is playing a role in the Covid- 19 situation today.

Several new articles have been written about the subject in light of recent events,
you may find others that will be interesting to read. If so please feel free to share
them in our Facebook event for others to read.

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you want to
catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you,
please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop with
the subject line ‘Online Discussion’ and we will send you a link to
the call the day before.

PLEASE NOTE we mistakenly gave out a new email address for this
group during the week. Our apologies!

All are very welcome.

16/5/20 – In Praise of Idleness

Bertrand Russell
was a British
philosopher,
logician, and
social reformer,
founding figure
in the analytic
movement in
Anglo-American
philosophy,
and recipient
of the Nobel Prize
for Literature in 1950.

If you want to join this discussion – email info@dublinfood.coop with the subject
‘Online Discussion’ and we will send you a link to the call the day before.

This week we will be reading Bertrand Russell’s ‘In Praise of Idleness’. This 1932
essay considers the relationship between leisure and social justice. While lockdown
measures are beginning to slightly loosen and thoughts turn towards what normal
everyday life may look like in the near future it is an apt time to consider human’s
relationship to work and what it means.

You can read the essay here.

Russell’s contributions to logic, epistemology, and the philosophy of mathematics established
him as one of the foremost philosophers of the 20th century. To the general public, however,
he was best known as a campaigner for peace and as a popular writer on social,
political, and moral subjects.

Read more about Bertrand Russell here.

If you don’t have time to read it the essay in advance but feel like you want to catch up
with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you, please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop with the subject
‘Online Discussion’ and we will send you a link to the call the day before.

All are very welcome.

DFC

9/5/20 – From Crisis to Commons

This Saturday we will be discussing how a crisis can lead to ways in which we all preserve
and protect those things that matter to all of us – such as food, public space and healthcare.
We will be discussing Silvia Federici’s essay ‘Crisis to Commons’. If you like you can read this essay
in advance by downloading it from this link below.

Silvia Federici is a feminist activist, writer, and a teacher. In 1972 she was one of the cofounders of the International Feminist Collective, the organisation that launched the Wages For Housework campaign internationally. Read more about her here.

Dublin Food Co-operative will meet again to discuss ideas and issues related to our current
situation and trying to envisage what a future, more sustainable future might look like.


Can things go back to ‘normal’ after the lockdown is lifted? Should we go back to normal?
In past weeks we have discussed topics that touch on ideas about resources that we all
share in common, ways to better structure our economy, and what are the
advantages of the co-operative model?


We will be thinking about how we might view this new situation and how it might allow us
as a larger community to reassert the values we cherish at Dublin Food Co-operative:
economic democracy, mutualism, and community.


Even if you do not have time to read it the essay in advance but feel like you want to
catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you, please
join us on Saturday 9 May at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion – email info@dublinfood.coop with the subject
‘Online Discussion’ and we will send you a link to the call the day before.


All our members are very welcome!

. . . . . . . . . .

Do you have an idea for the next reading, podcast, or film you’d like to recommend
for our online meet up? Please bring your suggestions along!

DFC

DFC

2/5/20The Commons

The first member-led online discussion got off to a great start with a diverse mix of members talking about Doughnut Economics by Kate Raworth.

In 2009 Elinor Ostrom won the Nobel Prize for Economics for her work on the commons. She published Governing the Commons in 1990. Ostrom’s work was mentioned in our first discussion last week . This week her ideas will continue our discussion.

“The commons is the cultural and natural resources accessible to all members of a society, including natural materials such as air, water, and a habitable earth. These resources are held in common, not owned privately.”


We will be hosting the second online discussion on the topic of ‘The Commons’ through the lens of Elinor Ostrom who won a Nobel Prize for Economics in 2009 for her work on the subject.


If you want to join this discussion – email with the subject ‘Online Discussion 2’ to info@dublinfood.coop and we will send you a link to the call the day before.


You can access Elinor Ostrom’s Nobel Lecture as a text or video here.

You can find out more about Elinor’s life here.